What is the postpartum period?

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What is the postpartum period?

Do you really know?

What is the postpartum period? Thanks for asking!

Many people wrongly assume that all women immediately find their feet after having a baby. In reality, it can be an overwhelming phase which is often neglected. 

The postpartum period begins as the mother’s body starts returning to a non-pregnant state. It’s commonly used to refer to the first six weeks following childbirth, but it may last significantly longer, with a range of physical and psychological symptoms.

So what actually happens during the postpartum period?

Postpartum is a time of recovery for the new mother’s body. The uterus, which grows up to fifteen times bigger during pregnancy, contracts and returns to its normal size. Changing levels of hormones like progesterone and estrogen can cause hot flashes and sweating.

It’s best to stock up on disposable underwear for leaking and bleeding. Post-childbirth vaginal discharge, known as lochia, contains blood, mucus and uterine tissue. After the postpartum period is over, you should start feeling more like yourself again. Your body may also be ready to have sex.

Is postpartum just a fancy word for the baby blues then?

We shouldn’t confuse postpartum depression with the baby blues, which affect up to 80% of mothers. These short-term mood dips usually disappear within a week or two after the baby’s birth. 

Meanwhile, postpartum depression is more severe and lasts longer. The World Health Organisation has estimated that between 10% and 15% of women experience it. Whereas a mum with the baby blues might see her moods swing quickly from happy to sad, postpartum depression is characterised by constant feelings of hopelessness, worthlessness and loneliness.

Needless to say, this can quickly become overwhelming in the life of a young mother, making it difficult to complete daily activities for herself or her baby. 

 

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What is the postpartum period? Thanks for asking!

Many people wrongly assume that all women immediately find their feet after having a baby. In reality, it can be an overwhelming phase which is often neglected. 

The postpartum period begins as the mother’s body starts returning to a non-pregnant state. It’s commonly used to refer to the first six weeks following childbirth, but it may last significantly longer, with a range of physical and psychological symptoms.

So what actually happens during the postpartum period?

Postpartum is a time of recovery for the new mother’s body. The uterus, which grows up to fifteen times bigger during pregnancy, contracts and returns to its normal size. Changing levels of hormones like progesterone and estrogen can cause hot flashes and sweating.

It’s best to stock up on disposable underwear for leaking and bleeding. Post-childbirth vaginal discharge, known as lochia, contains blood, mucus and uterine tissue. After the postpartum period is over, you should start feeling more like yourself again. Your body may also be ready to have sex.

Is postpartum just a fancy word for the baby blues then?

We shouldn’t confuse postpartum depression with the baby blues, which affect up to 80% of mothers. These short-term mood dips usually disappear within a week or two after the baby’s birth. 

Meanwhile, postpartum depression is more severe and lasts longer. The World Health Organisation has estimated that between 10% and 15% of women experience it. Whereas a mum with the baby blues might see her moods swing quickly from happy to sad, postpartum depression is characterised by constant feelings of hopelessness, worthlessness and loneliness.

Needless to say, this can quickly become overwhelming in the life of a young mother, making it difficult to complete daily activities for herself or her baby. 

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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