What is ASMR?

Do you really know?

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What is ASMR?

Do you really know?

What is ASMR? Thanks for asking!

ASMR is short for autonomous sensory meridian response. It refers to the pleasant tingling sensations some people feel when triggered by certain sensory stimuli. These sensations tend to begin on the scalp and work their way down throughout the body, bringing on a state of relaxation. 

In the 2010s, ASMR was popularised to such an extent that there are thousands of videos available online for those looking to experience it. Most often, ASMR is brought on by an audio stimulus, so it’s recommended to listen with headphones to really enhance the sounds going into your ears. That’s especially true when the recordings have been made with a binaural microphone.

Other kinds of triggers are visual, like hand movements, or tactile, like light touches against the skin.

Are you saying it took us until the 21st century to discover such sensations? 

Well, in reality the sensations have existed since forever, but it wasn’t until 2010 that anyone put a name on them. Jennifer Allen, herself an ASMR content creator, coined the scientific-sounding acronym on a Facebook group and it caught on. Allen has since explained she wanted the term to come across as clinical, so people could talk about it openly without fear of being ridiculed. There’s almost no science on ASMR.

Since then, this digital-age relaxation method has become a true sensation. Each month, there are over 11 million searches for ASMR on Youtube, and the most viewed videos have tens of millions of plays. The influencers posting these are known as ASMRtists and they have to regularly come up with new ideas to keep their content fresh.

What are the most common ASMR triggers? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!

To listen to the last episodes, you can click here:

What is Wikipedia?

What is Parler?

What is Signal?

A podcast written and realised by Joseph Chance.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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What is ASMR? Thanks for asking!

ASMR is short for autonomous sensory meridian response. It refers to the pleasant tingling sensations some people feel when triggered by certain sensory stimuli. These sensations tend to begin on the scalp and work their way down throughout the body, bringing on a state of relaxation. 

In the 2010s, ASMR was popularised to such an extent that there are thousands of videos available online for those looking to experience it. Most often, ASMR is brought on by an audio stimulus, so it’s recommended to listen with headphones to really enhance the sounds going into your ears. That’s especially true when the recordings have been made with a binaural microphone.

Other kinds of triggers are visual, like hand movements, or tactile, like light touches against the skin.

Are you saying it took us until the 21st century to discover such sensations? 

Well, in reality the sensations have existed since forever, but it wasn’t until 2010 that anyone put a name on them. Jennifer Allen, herself an ASMR content creator, coined the scientific-sounding acronym on a Facebook group and it caught on. Allen has since explained she wanted the term to come across as clinical, so people could talk about it openly without fear of being ridiculed. There’s almost no science on ASMR.

Since then, this digital-age relaxation method has become a true sensation. Each month, there are over 11 million searches for ASMR on Youtube, and the most viewed videos have tens of millions of plays. The influencers posting these are known as ASMRtists and they have to regularly come up with new ideas to keep their content fresh.

What are the most common ASMR triggers? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!

To listen to the last episodes, you can click here:

What is Wikipedia?

What is Parler?

What is Signal?

A podcast written and realised by Joseph Chance.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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