‌What is linguistic discrimination?

Do you really know?

0:00
00:02:43
10
10

‌What is linguistic discrimination?

Do you really know?

‌What is linguistic discrimination? Thanks for asking!

Also known as glottophobia, linguistic discrimination is a form of prejudice based on a person’s way of speaking. For example, it could consist of mocking someone for their mother tongue, accent, or the range of vocabulary they use. Victims of linguistic discrimination are judged and treated differently as soon as they open their mouths. Studies into linguistic discrimination date back to the 1980s. Researchers noted the difficulties that non-native-English speakers encountered at work in the United States. Linguistic discrimination is also seen as one of the main factors in turning down a candidate for a job. Sometimes, this form of discrimination is even more brutal. In some cases in China, ethnic minorities are forced to abandon their languages. Similar policies were carried out by colonialists in past centuries, like the British Empire in Ireland, Wales and Scotland.

But why would anyone reject people based on their accent? 

An accent or dialect are an important part of a person’s identity. He sounds foreign, she sounds like she’s from the countryside, he doesn’t sound well-educated etc. Traditionally, accents heard on the TV and radio have been held in higher esteem. In the UK, 28% of people feel they have suffered discrimination due to having a regional accent. Across the Channel in France, linguistic discrimination is worst for those from the north of the country, but those with strong southern accents aren’t spared. Back in 2018, politician Jean-Luc Melenchon openly mocked a journalist from Toulouse for her southwestern accent in front of TV cameras. MP Laetitia Avia then proposed a new law recognising glottophobia as a form of discrimination, but the idea ended up being abandoned.

So if you have a strong accent, should you see a speech therapist to mask it? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!

To listen the last episodes, you can click here:

What is consent?

What is the US Supreme Court?

What is gaslighting?

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Episodes
Date
Duration
Recommended episodes :

What is the circular economy?

Do you really know?

What is a unicorn?

Do you really know?

What is Tourette’s Syndrome?

Do you really know?

The podcast Do you really know? has been added to your home screen.

‌What is linguistic discrimination? Thanks for asking!

Also known as glottophobia, linguistic discrimination is a form of prejudice based on a person’s way of speaking. For example, it could consist of mocking someone for their mother tongue, accent, or the range of vocabulary they use. Victims of linguistic discrimination are judged and treated differently as soon as they open their mouths. Studies into linguistic discrimination date back to the 1980s. Researchers noted the difficulties that non-native-English speakers encountered at work in the United States. Linguistic discrimination is also seen as one of the main factors in turning down a candidate for a job. Sometimes, this form of discrimination is even more brutal. In some cases in China, ethnic minorities are forced to abandon their languages. Similar policies were carried out by colonialists in past centuries, like the British Empire in Ireland, Wales and Scotland.

But why would anyone reject people based on their accent? 

An accent or dialect are an important part of a person’s identity. He sounds foreign, she sounds like she’s from the countryside, he doesn’t sound well-educated etc. Traditionally, accents heard on the TV and radio have been held in higher esteem. In the UK, 28% of people feel they have suffered discrimination due to having a regional accent. Across the Channel in France, linguistic discrimination is worst for those from the north of the country, but those with strong southern accents aren’t spared. Back in 2018, politician Jean-Luc Melenchon openly mocked a journalist from Toulouse for her southwestern accent in front of TV cameras. MP Laetitia Avia then proposed a new law recognising glottophobia as a form of discrimination, but the idea ended up being abandoned.

So if you have a strong accent, should you see a speech therapist to mask it? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!

To listen the last episodes, you can click here:

What is consent?

What is the US Supreme Court?

What is gaslighting?

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Subscribe Install Share
Do you really know?

Thank you for your subscription

For a better experience, also consider installing the application.

Install