What is a heatwave?

Do you really know?

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What is a heatwave?

Do you really know?

What is a heatwave? Thanks for asking!

We’re experiencing more intense and frequent heatwaves than ever before, and it’s one of the most tangible effects of climate change. These summer periods of extreme heat are a threat to the elderly, children and the poor. To meet the World Meteorological Organization’s definition of a heatwave, the period must last 5 days or longer. The daily maximum temperature must also be at least 5° higher than the average maximum temperature. This means the requirements can vary by region. Some nations have their own definition of a heatwave. For example, the UK’s Met Office uses a system called Heat Health Watch. To determine whether a heatwave is occurring, the maximum daytime temperature and minimum nighttime temperature are compared to regional thresholds. A four-level system is used to score each Local Authority area, with Level 4 being the highest. 

So what actually causes a heatwave then?

Scientifically speaking, heatwaves are the result of trapped air. High-pressure systems force the air downwards, forming a cap over an affected area. This prevents precipitation from forming, leading to a continual buildup of heat. In the Northern Hemisphere, this happens most often in July and August, even if we have now started seeing heatwaves earlier in the year. The problem is that heatwaves have a number of consequences. First of all, think of the environmental impact. They lead to shortages of drinking water, destroy food-producing crops, increase pollution and the risk of forest fires. But there are also direct human health issues. Extreme heat wears out those who are most vulnerable, like the elderly, children or the sick. It can make existing illnesses worse or cause serious heatstrokes.

What are the guidelines? Who has the greater risks? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!

To listen the last episodes, you can click here:

What is a micro adventure?

What is an eco-friendly beach?

What is Blackface?

 

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What is a heatwave? Thanks for asking!

We’re experiencing more intense and frequent heatwaves than ever before, and it’s one of the most tangible effects of climate change. These summer periods of extreme heat are a threat to the elderly, children and the poor. To meet the World Meteorological Organization’s definition of a heatwave, the period must last 5 days or longer. The daily maximum temperature must also be at least 5° higher than the average maximum temperature. This means the requirements can vary by region. Some nations have their own definition of a heatwave. For example, the UK’s Met Office uses a system called Heat Health Watch. To determine whether a heatwave is occurring, the maximum daytime temperature and minimum nighttime temperature are compared to regional thresholds. A four-level system is used to score each Local Authority area, with Level 4 being the highest. 

So what actually causes a heatwave then?

Scientifically speaking, heatwaves are the result of trapped air. High-pressure systems force the air downwards, forming a cap over an affected area. This prevents precipitation from forming, leading to a continual buildup of heat. In the Northern Hemisphere, this happens most often in July and August, even if we have now started seeing heatwaves earlier in the year. The problem is that heatwaves have a number of consequences. First of all, think of the environmental impact. They lead to shortages of drinking water, destroy food-producing crops, increase pollution and the risk of forest fires. But there are also direct human health issues. Extreme heat wears out those who are most vulnerable, like the elderly, children or the sick. It can make existing illnesses worse or cause serious heatstrokes.

What are the guidelines? Who has the greater risks? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!

To listen the last episodes, you can click here:

What is a micro adventure?

What is an eco-friendly beach?

What is Blackface?

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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