What is Misophonia?

Do you really know?

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What is Misophonia?

Do you really know?

What is Misophonia?

You probably won’t find it on autocorrect or spell check, but misophonia is a condition which affects up to 15% of adults. The term literally means “hatred of sound” and it was coined in the 2000s by Margaret and Pawel Jastreboff, audiologists at the University of Atlanta. Misophonia is a condition when specific sounds trigger negative emotions, thoughts and even physical reactions.

For example, it could be the sound of a person whistling, chewing or tapping which just drives you nuts. An alternative name for misophonia is Selective Sound Sensitivity Syndrome, or 4S for short.

Some scientists believe that it’s a neurological disorder while others see it as an anxiety problem. Studies have shown that misophonia sufferers display high levels of activity in the anterior insular cortex when subjected to trigger sounds. That’s a part of the brain that processes emotions and how our attention is directed.

Like with most psychiatric problems, misophonia affects people with varying degrees. Not everyone has symptoms to the same extent. Think of that person who complained when you ate an apple too loudly in their proximity. They probably don’t need therapy. SON Even if by simply avoiding the problem, they risk disturbing social or professional relationships. 

Many misophonia patients talk of a startling jolt when they hear trigger sounds, instantly taking them out of a relaxed state. It’s known as a reflexive aversive response, and they experience strong feelings like rage and disgust.

Many with the disorder report that their reactions intensify over time. There are a few options for treating or managing it. Some of the most common are antidepressants, neurofeedback, earplugs and soundproofing.

 

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What is Misophonia?

You probably won’t find it on autocorrect or spell check, but misophonia is a condition which affects up to 15% of adults. The term literally means “hatred of sound” and it was coined in the 2000s by Margaret and Pawel Jastreboff, audiologists at the University of Atlanta. Misophonia is a condition when specific sounds trigger negative emotions, thoughts and even physical reactions.

For example, it could be the sound of a person whistling, chewing or tapping which just drives you nuts. An alternative name for misophonia is Selective Sound Sensitivity Syndrome, or 4S for short.

Some scientists believe that it’s a neurological disorder while others see it as an anxiety problem. Studies have shown that misophonia sufferers display high levels of activity in the anterior insular cortex when subjected to trigger sounds. That’s a part of the brain that processes emotions and how our attention is directed.

Like with most psychiatric problems, misophonia affects people with varying degrees. Not everyone has symptoms to the same extent. Think of that person who complained when you ate an apple too loudly in their proximity. They probably don’t need therapy. SON Even if by simply avoiding the problem, they risk disturbing social or professional relationships. 

Many misophonia patients talk of a startling jolt when they hear trigger sounds, instantly taking them out of a relaxed state. It’s known as a reflexive aversive response, and they experience strong feelings like rage and disgust.

Many with the disorder report that their reactions intensify over time. There are a few options for treating or managing it. Some of the most common are antidepressants, neurofeedback, earplugs and soundproofing.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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