What is telehealth?

Do you really know?

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What is telehealth?

Do you really know?

What is telehealth?

Telehealth refers to remote health services which are provided using technology. While the technologies have been around for decades, uptake has been relatively slow. That’s changed with the current COVID-19 pandemic however, as telehealth has become a must for patients and doctors alike.  

The terms telehealth and telemedicine are sometimes used interchangeably, though the scope of telehealth is seen as being greater. The World Health Organisation recognises that telemedicine is “an open and constantly evolving science, as it incorporates new advancements in technology and responds and adapts to the changing health needs and contexts of societies. 

The most obvious example of telehealth is a medical appointment carried out by videoconference, rather than face-to-face. You simply use an online service to book your appointment in advance and then connect to the service at the agreed time.

But other kinds of processes or procedures also fall under this label. For example, when one doctor contacts another in order to ask for their opinion, or receives guidance while performing a medical act on a patient.

Self-monitoring enables medical professionals to follow patients remotely, using various devices. This is particularly useful for long-term conditions like heart disease, diabetes and asthma. Studies of these scenarios have shown that health outcomes are generally comparable to in-person appointments, while offering greater satisfaction and cost savings.  

Teleconsultations also help with other growing challenges, like caring for an ageing population, monitoring chronic conditions and providing healthcare for residents of so-called medical deserts. Those are remote areas where a previously existing hospital may have closed, and no doctors are physically based.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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What is telehealth?

Telehealth refers to remote health services which are provided using technology. While the technologies have been around for decades, uptake has been relatively slow. That’s changed with the current COVID-19 pandemic however, as telehealth has become a must for patients and doctors alike.  

The terms telehealth and telemedicine are sometimes used interchangeably, though the scope of telehealth is seen as being greater. The World Health Organisation recognises that telemedicine is “an open and constantly evolving science, as it incorporates new advancements in technology and responds and adapts to the changing health needs and contexts of societies. 

The most obvious example of telehealth is a medical appointment carried out by videoconference, rather than face-to-face. You simply use an online service to book your appointment in advance and then connect to the service at the agreed time.

But other kinds of processes or procedures also fall under this label. For example, when one doctor contacts another in order to ask for their opinion, or receives guidance while performing a medical act on a patient.

Self-monitoring enables medical professionals to follow patients remotely, using various devices. This is particularly useful for long-term conditions like heart disease, diabetes and asthma. Studies of these scenarios have shown that health outcomes are generally comparable to in-person appointments, while offering greater satisfaction and cost savings.  

Teleconsultations also help with other growing challenges, like caring for an ageing population, monitoring chronic conditions and providing healthcare for residents of so-called medical deserts. Those are remote areas where a previously existing hospital may have closed, and no doctors are physically based.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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