What is male contraception?

Do you really know?

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What is male contraception?

Do you really know?

What is male contraception?

We’ve all heard of the pill and the coil for women, but did you know that male contraceptives also exist? The obvious examples are condoms and the withdrawal method, but new solutions are being developed in the form of gels, shots and even thermal underwear. Many have tried and failed in the past, with no such products yet achieving commercial success.

The ideal situation would be to have a form of male birth control that’s safe, effective and reversible. Of course, there are also vasectomies for those who are looking for something more permanent. As you may know, a vasectomy is a surgical procedure which consists of sealing off the tubes which carry sperm.

Male pills have already been developed. They basically rely on hormonal modifications, in the same way as female contraceptive pills. By suppressing two types of male hormones called FSH and LH, a decrease in testosterone production and sperm count is brought about. But it’s a hard sell to some guys, who feel anything that affects their male hormones will make them less of a man.

Pharmaceutical companies are looking to find other ways of making sperm less mobile, and therefore less likely to fertilize an egg. They have tried gels which can be injected into the penis or the vas deferens ducts, preventing sperm from leaving a man’s body. It’s even been speculated that something as simple as a nasal spray or a pill could be used just before sex, with an immediate effect that lasts up to two days. 

Finally, thermal underwear can be used to raise the temperature in a man’s testicles, which has the effect of reducing sperm production.

While this is all very interesting, some tests have shown unwanted side effects and the methods aren’t yet ready for large-scale production. News stories spring up every now and then promising a male pill within a few years, but nothing has been able to fit the bill.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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What is male contraception?

We’ve all heard of the pill and the coil for women, but did you know that male contraceptives also exist? The obvious examples are condoms and the withdrawal method, but new solutions are being developed in the form of gels, shots and even thermal underwear. Many have tried and failed in the past, with no such products yet achieving commercial success.

The ideal situation would be to have a form of male birth control that’s safe, effective and reversible. Of course, there are also vasectomies for those who are looking for something more permanent. As you may know, a vasectomy is a surgical procedure which consists of sealing off the tubes which carry sperm.

Male pills have already been developed. They basically rely on hormonal modifications, in the same way as female contraceptive pills. By suppressing two types of male hormones called FSH and LH, a decrease in testosterone production and sperm count is brought about. But it’s a hard sell to some guys, who feel anything that affects their male hormones will make them less of a man.

Pharmaceutical companies are looking to find other ways of making sperm less mobile, and therefore less likely to fertilize an egg. They have tried gels which can be injected into the penis or the vas deferens ducts, preventing sperm from leaving a man’s body. It’s even been speculated that something as simple as a nasal spray or a pill could be used just before sex, with an immediate effect that lasts up to two days. 

Finally, thermal underwear can be used to raise the temperature in a man’s testicles, which has the effect of reducing sperm production.

While this is all very interesting, some tests have shown unwanted side effects and the methods aren’t yet ready for large-scale production. News stories spring up every now and then promising a male pill within a few years, but nothing has been able to fit the bill.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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