What is cruelty free?

Do you really know?

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What is cruelty free?

Do you really know?

What is cruelty free?

Cruelty free is a label for products which don’t cause harm to animals. This kind of guarantee is designed to reassure consumers who refuse to buy products which are tested on animals. It’s most often used to describe cosmetics, but can also apply to a wide range of other household and pet products.

There are many cruelty free labels around, but the main premise is generally the same: No end product or ingredient comes from or has been tested on animals. Suppliers have to prove they do not carry out animal testing and brands must agree to random testing.

Cruelty-free shopping had become popular by the 1990s, but the concept was sometimes misleading and confusing. Brands were designing their own logos to certify their products as cruelty-free, according to their own definition of the term. Animal protection groups were excluded and clearly this important issue needed addressing by independent organisations.

Among the many different labels seen today, two of the most strict are The Leaping Bunny Program from Cruelty Free International and Beauty Without Bunnies by PETA. Both feature extensive online databases on cruelty-free companies. Visitors can search by country, by product type and whether the company tests on animals or not. PETA require a company’s CEO to sign a statement of assurance guaranteeing they and their suppliers will never carry out any form of animal testing.

If you’re wondering which cosmetics brands are cruelty-free, Lush is one of the safest options out there. The international company has had a no animal testing policy in place since it was first created. Others include Urban Decay, Too Faced and The Body Shop.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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What is cruelty free?

Cruelty free is a label for products which don’t cause harm to animals. This kind of guarantee is designed to reassure consumers who refuse to buy products which are tested on animals. It’s most often used to describe cosmetics, but can also apply to a wide range of other household and pet products.

There are many cruelty free labels around, but the main premise is generally the same: No end product or ingredient comes from or has been tested on animals. Suppliers have to prove they do not carry out animal testing and brands must agree to random testing.

Cruelty-free shopping had become popular by the 1990s, but the concept was sometimes misleading and confusing. Brands were designing their own logos to certify their products as cruelty-free, according to their own definition of the term. Animal protection groups were excluded and clearly this important issue needed addressing by independent organisations.

Among the many different labels seen today, two of the most strict are The Leaping Bunny Program from Cruelty Free International and Beauty Without Bunnies by PETA. Both feature extensive online databases on cruelty-free companies. Visitors can search by country, by product type and whether the company tests on animals or not. PETA require a company’s CEO to sign a statement of assurance guaranteeing they and their suppliers will never carry out any form of animal testing.

If you’re wondering which cosmetics brands are cruelty-free, Lush is one of the safest options out there. The international company has had a no animal testing policy in place since it was first created. Others include Urban Decay, Too Faced and The Body Shop.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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