What is the Blob?

Do you really know?

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What is the Blob?

Do you really know?

What is the Blob?

The blob is a nickname for Physarum Polycephalum, a slime mold that can detect and digest food, move around and procreate. It’s ultra-resistant and has capacities for learning and transmitting information. While it had been largely ignored for a very long time, the blob and its distinctive features have been getting a lot of attention of late. 

That’s largely thanks to a public unveiling in late 2019, at the city zoo in Paris, France. Scientists in the French zoo grew the blob in a petri dish, before grafting it onto tree bark when it was large enough in size.  

The Blob nickname is inspired by the 1958 movie of the same name. In the movie, a gooey alien lifeform lands on planet Earth and begins consuming everything in its path, all the while growing bigger and bigger. In reality, the Blob has been present on Earth for between 500 million and 1 billion years. But humans were unaware of it for a long time and confused it for lichen or mushrooms. 

The blob looks most like a mushroom, but it’s not a fungus. It produces pigments, but it’s not a plant. Finally it moves and feeds itself, but it’s not an animal either. The blob is a single-celled organism, which can be classed as a protist. That’s basically a scientific term for something that can’t be described as a fungus, plant or animal. With over 720 sex chromosome combinations, they procreate at great ease, dividing from their core and growing exponentially. A blob measuring nearly half a square mile has already been seen in the USA. 

There are thousands of different kinds of blob, of all colours. It is most often yellow, but can also be found in other shades like red, pink and white. Some live on land, some in water. The blob moves around using its network of veins, but it’s not the fastest of organisms. It’s average speed varies from 1 to 4 centimetres per hour.

 

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What is the Blob?

The blob is a nickname for Physarum Polycephalum, a slime mold that can detect and digest food, move around and procreate. It’s ultra-resistant and has capacities for learning and transmitting information. While it had been largely ignored for a very long time, the blob and its distinctive features have been getting a lot of attention of late. 

That’s largely thanks to a public unveiling in late 2019, at the city zoo in Paris, France. Scientists in the French zoo grew the blob in a petri dish, before grafting it onto tree bark when it was large enough in size.  

The Blob nickname is inspired by the 1958 movie of the same name. In the movie, a gooey alien lifeform lands on planet Earth and begins consuming everything in its path, all the while growing bigger and bigger. In reality, the Blob has been present on Earth for between 500 million and 1 billion years. But humans were unaware of it for a long time and confused it for lichen or mushrooms. 

The blob looks most like a mushroom, but it’s not a fungus. It produces pigments, but it’s not a plant. Finally it moves and feeds itself, but it’s not an animal either. The blob is a single-celled organism, which can be classed as a protist. That’s basically a scientific term for something that can’t be described as a fungus, plant or animal. With over 720 sex chromosome combinations, they procreate at great ease, dividing from their core and growing exponentially. A blob measuring nearly half a square mile has already been seen in the USA. 

There are thousands of different kinds of blob, of all colours. It is most often yellow, but can also be found in other shades like red, pink and white. Some live on land, some in water. The blob moves around using its network of veins, but it’s not the fastest of organisms. It’s average speed varies from 1 to 4 centimetres per hour.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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