What are hikikomori?

Do you really know?

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What are hikikomori?

Do you really know?

What are hikikomori?

A hikikomori is a reclusive person who withdraws from society and lives in their own home all the time. This isolation phenomenon is mainly recognised in Japan, where it’s believed there are over one million hikikomori. Local authorities are concerned about what may happen to these people, as well as their increasing numbers.

The word hikikomori literally means “pulling inward” or “being confined”. Meanwhile, the Japanese government defines a hikikomori as a person who has remained isolated for over 6 months. That means they haven’t attended school or work, and have refused to leave their home or family home. In that time, they also haven’t had any real social interaction outside of their family circle. Despite being social recluses, hikikomori don’t necessarily have any mental health issues and they are rarely suicidal.

Each individual has their own story. People may become hikikomori due to retirement, sickness, financial difficulties or family pressure. Sociologist Teppei Sekimizu explains that Japanese society has a tendency towards collectivism. A person’s perceived worth is often based on their ability to conform to the rules of collective life. Hikikomoris don’t fit in and this leads to their acute social withdrawal. porte de prison

When this particular demographic was baptised as hikikomori in the 1990s, it mainly concerned young people who were unable to find work. Since then, it’s become more common among middle-aged people, with their numbers now matching their younger counterparts. Among hikikomori who are over 40, more than half have been isolated for over five years, and nearly 20% for 20 years or more. Some live with their parents who may be in their 70s or 80s. Others live alone and end up becoming kodokushi. That means a person who dies alone and remains undiscovered, potentially for months or years.

 

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What are hikikomori?

A hikikomori is a reclusive person who withdraws from society and lives in their own home all the time. This isolation phenomenon is mainly recognised in Japan, where it’s believed there are over one million hikikomori. Local authorities are concerned about what may happen to these people, as well as their increasing numbers.

The word hikikomori literally means “pulling inward” or “being confined”. Meanwhile, the Japanese government defines a hikikomori as a person who has remained isolated for over 6 months. That means they haven’t attended school or work, and have refused to leave their home or family home. In that time, they also haven’t had any real social interaction outside of their family circle. Despite being social recluses, hikikomori don’t necessarily have any mental health issues and they are rarely suicidal.

Each individual has their own story. People may become hikikomori due to retirement, sickness, financial difficulties or family pressure. Sociologist Teppei Sekimizu explains that Japanese society has a tendency towards collectivism. A person’s perceived worth is often based on their ability to conform to the rules of collective life. Hikikomoris don’t fit in and this leads to their acute social withdrawal. porte de prison

When this particular demographic was baptised as hikikomori in the 1990s, it mainly concerned young people who were unable to find work. Since then, it’s become more common among middle-aged people, with their numbers now matching their younger counterparts. Among hikikomori who are over 40, more than half have been isolated for over five years, and nearly 20% for 20 years or more. Some live with their parents who may be in their 70s or 80s. Others live alone and end up becoming kodokushi. That means a person who dies alone and remains undiscovered, potentially for months or years.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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