What is a power nap?

Do you really know?

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What is a power nap?

Do you really know?

What is a power nap?

A power nap is a short sleep which is long enough to give an energy boost, but not so long that you enter deep sleep. The term was coined by American social psychologist James Maas, a professor at Cornell University. Science shows that power naps could be of benefit to employees in the workplace, where efficiency is key.

Sometimes, a power nap lasts just a few seconds, in which case it’s referred to as a microsleep. Dali would do it in a seated position, holding a spoon between his fingers. When he started to fall asleep, his grip on the spoon would loosen and the sound of the spoon hitting the floor would of course wake him up immediately. Microsleeps can be experienced in front of our computers, or in public transport, when we are woken by our heads nodding. Power naps supplement regular sleep, in order to maximise its benefits for the body. That’s especially true for those who don’t get enough sleep at night time.

The ideal length of a power nap is 15 to 20 minutes. This allows the body enough time to enter a light sleep stage and remain there for at least 2 minutes. It also helps us to feel in good shape for a whole afternoon. Nevertheless, be careful not to go over 30 minutes when napping. Otherwise you may enter a deep sleep phase. That can result in feeling groggy and disoriented when waking up, basically more tired than before starting the nap and wiping out its benefits.

For many years, scientists have been studying the benefits of sleep, in the form of both naps and longer length. Tests have been run on a wide range of cognitive processes, generally showing naps to be as beneficial as a full night’s sleep for some memory-related tasks. Other studies have shown the possible impact of napping on our health, in particular reducing the risk of heart attacks and strokes.

 

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What is a power nap?

A power nap is a short sleep which is long enough to give an energy boost, but not so long that you enter deep sleep. The term was coined by American social psychologist James Maas, a professor at Cornell University. Science shows that power naps could be of benefit to employees in the workplace, where efficiency is key.

Sometimes, a power nap lasts just a few seconds, in which case it’s referred to as a microsleep. Dali would do it in a seated position, holding a spoon between his fingers. When he started to fall asleep, his grip on the spoon would loosen and the sound of the spoon hitting the floor would of course wake him up immediately. Microsleeps can be experienced in front of our computers, or in public transport, when we are woken by our heads nodding. Power naps supplement regular sleep, in order to maximise its benefits for the body. That’s especially true for those who don’t get enough sleep at night time.

The ideal length of a power nap is 15 to 20 minutes. This allows the body enough time to enter a light sleep stage and remain there for at least 2 minutes. It also helps us to feel in good shape for a whole afternoon. Nevertheless, be careful not to go over 30 minutes when napping. Otherwise you may enter a deep sleep phase. That can result in feeling groggy and disoriented when waking up, basically more tired than before starting the nap and wiping out its benefits.

For many years, scientists have been studying the benefits of sleep, in the form of both naps and longer length. Tests have been run on a wide range of cognitive processes, generally showing naps to be as beneficial as a full night’s sleep for some memory-related tasks. Other studies have shown the possible impact of napping on our health, in particular reducing the risk of heart attacks and strokes.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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