What is computer vision syndrome?

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What is computer vision syndrome?

Do you really know?

What is computer vision syndrome?

From our smartphone screens first thing in the morning to an evening spent in front of the TV, electronic visual displays are an inescapable part of our daily routines. In the middle, many have a 9 to 5 job sat in front of a desktop, not to mention checking social media or playing games to speed up the daily commute. Computer vision syndrome refers to eye strain caused by overuse of electronic screens. The whole eye is affected by this strain, leading to symptoms like headaches, back and neck pains, blurred vision and the inability to focus. 

Those who spend their whole working day in front of a computer screen are most likely to suffer from computer vision syndrome. Looking into a screen all day long requires a great deal of concentration, which means we blink a lot less than we need to. The eye therefore becomes dry, affecting the conjunctiva and cornea. Our eyes move constantly, which explains how they become tired and vision can be blurred. However, there’s not enough scientific perspective and detailed research to really understand the impact of this screen consumption on our overall health and eyes in particular.

Visual system development in children is long and sensitive. The quality of a child’s visual experience is critical in this process. Neuroplasticity is most active in children under the age of 6. It then gradually decreases until 10 - 12 years old. So parents should limit children’s exposure to electronic screen between those ages, while vision is developing. 

One golden rule is the 20-20-20 rule. Every 20 minutes, take a 20-second break to look at something 20 feet away. This gives our eyes a well-deserved break to remoisten and helps reduce symptoms. Another tip is to remember to blink, which we are supposed to do 12 times per minute on average. In front of a computer screen, however, we only blink 5 times a minute, which brings on the eye drying effect. You can treat the discomfort with eye drops or simply by forcing yourself to blink.

 

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What is computer vision syndrome?

From our smartphone screens first thing in the morning to an evening spent in front of the TV, electronic visual displays are an inescapable part of our daily routines. In the middle, many have a 9 to 5 job sat in front of a desktop, not to mention checking social media or playing games to speed up the daily commute. Computer vision syndrome refers to eye strain caused by overuse of electronic screens. The whole eye is affected by this strain, leading to symptoms like headaches, back and neck pains, blurred vision and the inability to focus. 

Those who spend their whole working day in front of a computer screen are most likely to suffer from computer vision syndrome. Looking into a screen all day long requires a great deal of concentration, which means we blink a lot less than we need to. The eye therefore becomes dry, affecting the conjunctiva and cornea. Our eyes move constantly, which explains how they become tired and vision can be blurred. However, there’s not enough scientific perspective and detailed research to really understand the impact of this screen consumption on our overall health and eyes in particular.

Visual system development in children is long and sensitive. The quality of a child’s visual experience is critical in this process. Neuroplasticity is most active in children under the age of 6. It then gradually decreases until 10 - 12 years old. So parents should limit children’s exposure to electronic screen between those ages, while vision is developing. 

One golden rule is the 20-20-20 rule. Every 20 minutes, take a 20-second break to look at something 20 feet away. This gives our eyes a well-deserved break to remoisten and helps reduce symptoms. Another tip is to remember to blink, which we are supposed to do 12 times per minute on average. In front of a computer screen, however, we only blink 5 times a minute, which brings on the eye drying effect. You can treat the discomfort with eye drops or simply by forcing yourself to blink.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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