What is berberine?

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What is berberine?

Do you really know?

What is berberine?

Berberine is a natural alkaloid, which means it’s an active compound of plant origin. It’s found in a lot of dietary supplements due to its supposed benefits against certain diseases. Basically, berberine is often seen as medicinal, without really having the status. Like any medicine, it can have harmful side effects.

Berberine can be found in the roots and bark of berberis plants, like barberry, Chinese coptis or goldenseals. It’s used in Chinese medicine to treat stomach infections like bacterial diarrhea.

Berberine is getting more attention in the USA, partly due to its neuroprotective qualities and even more so its effect on blood sugar levels. It could reduce blood sugar and cholesterol, making it of interest to those suffering from diabetes. 

Dpctors aren't yet prescribing berberine, as there’s not enough research out there to justify it being a treatment on its own. But it’s pretty easy to find berberine in dietary supplements. It has a real pharmacological effect on our cardiovascular, nervous and immune systems, not to mention metabolism. The standard dose for an adult is 1500mg per day, broken down into three equal doses. Research suggests this amount can be equally as effective as other pharmaceutical drugs in treating type 2 diabetes.

Like any medicine, berberine can have side effects like low blood sugar or fat levels. It can also cause uterine contractions and interfere with other medicines. Taking berberine when undergoing cancer treatment could make the treatment itself less effective.

That’s exactly what certain European countries have done. Slovenia, Sweden, Greece have all banned the sale of dietary supplements containing berberine. Meanwhile, Belgium and Poland recommend a maximum dose of 10mg per day. It’s not recommended for women to consume berberine during pregnancy or lactation. The same goes for children and teenagers, while people with diabetes or heart problems should always get medical advice before taking berberine.

 

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What is berberine?

Berberine is a natural alkaloid, which means it’s an active compound of plant origin. It’s found in a lot of dietary supplements due to its supposed benefits against certain diseases. Basically, berberine is often seen as medicinal, without really having the status. Like any medicine, it can have harmful side effects.

Berberine can be found in the roots and bark of berberis plants, like barberry, Chinese coptis or goldenseals. It’s used in Chinese medicine to treat stomach infections like bacterial diarrhea.

Berberine is getting more attention in the USA, partly due to its neuroprotective qualities and even more so its effect on blood sugar levels. It could reduce blood sugar and cholesterol, making it of interest to those suffering from diabetes. 

Dpctors aren't yet prescribing berberine, as there’s not enough research out there to justify it being a treatment on its own. But it’s pretty easy to find berberine in dietary supplements. It has a real pharmacological effect on our cardiovascular, nervous and immune systems, not to mention metabolism. The standard dose for an adult is 1500mg per day, broken down into three equal doses. Research suggests this amount can be equally as effective as other pharmaceutical drugs in treating type 2 diabetes.

Like any medicine, berberine can have side effects like low blood sugar or fat levels. It can also cause uterine contractions and interfere with other medicines. Taking berberine when undergoing cancer treatment could make the treatment itself less effective.

That’s exactly what certain European countries have done. Slovenia, Sweden, Greece have all banned the sale of dietary supplements containing berberine. Meanwhile, Belgium and Poland recommend a maximum dose of 10mg per day. It’s not recommended for women to consume berberine during pregnancy or lactation. The same goes for children and teenagers, while people with diabetes or heart problems should always get medical advice before taking berberine.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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