What is greenwashing ?

Do you really know?

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What is greenwashing ?

Do you really know?

What is greenwashing ?

Greenwashing is a marketing practice used by corporations to convince consumers that their business is environmentally friendly. Of course the aim is really to sell more products. Consumers may be convinced they are acting in an environmentally responsible way. While in reality brands are often hiding practices that are not at all helpful to the planet.

The term greenwashing first appeared at the start of the 1990s, around about the time mainstream Western society was becoming more aware of environmental issues. As soon as some kind of trend would appear, advertisers were lying in wait to capitalize. By the 2000s, ads using environmental claims were everywhere.

Greenwashing is often very visually apparent. A product’s packaging might change, or it could be the communication about the product. For example, the colour green is used more; you see more flowers, trees or animals. Sometimes brands are more explicit in boasting about their environmental performance. And in a way that a lot of people would see as being inappropriate.

Their products, whether it be anything from cars to detergents, can turn out to actually be harmful. In those cases, it’s borderline false advertising. In America, the Federal Trade Commission had to update its “Green Guides” in 2012, cracking down on greenwashing. Now brands have started using subtler tactics, making detection more difficult. 

Coffee is a perfect example and many authors have criticised this kind of greenwashing. 

One of the world’s best known coffee brands has managed to engineer a luxury image for itself, and also sell itself as being environmentally friendly. The reality is totally different however.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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What is greenwashing ?

Greenwashing is a marketing practice used by corporations to convince consumers that their business is environmentally friendly. Of course the aim is really to sell more products. Consumers may be convinced they are acting in an environmentally responsible way. While in reality brands are often hiding practices that are not at all helpful to the planet.

The term greenwashing first appeared at the start of the 1990s, around about the time mainstream Western society was becoming more aware of environmental issues. As soon as some kind of trend would appear, advertisers were lying in wait to capitalize. By the 2000s, ads using environmental claims were everywhere.

Greenwashing is often very visually apparent. A product’s packaging might change, or it could be the communication about the product. For example, the colour green is used more; you see more flowers, trees or animals. Sometimes brands are more explicit in boasting about their environmental performance. And in a way that a lot of people would see as being inappropriate.

Their products, whether it be anything from cars to detergents, can turn out to actually be harmful. In those cases, it’s borderline false advertising. In America, the Federal Trade Commission had to update its “Green Guides” in 2012, cracking down on greenwashing. Now brands have started using subtler tactics, making detection more difficult. 

Coffee is a perfect example and many authors have criticised this kind of greenwashing. 

One of the world’s best known coffee brands has managed to engineer a luxury image for itself, and also sell itself as being environmentally friendly. The reality is totally different however.

For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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